simple skin care tips

Tips for keeping your skin looking its best

Healthy skin can not only be an indicator of good health, but it can also make us feel better about ourselves. Record sales of anti-aging products can attest to that. However, when it comes to skin health, what you put in your body can be more important than what you put on your skin.

Health inside and out
Skin protects you from bacteria and viruses that can cause infections, helps you sense the outside world, such as whether it is hot or cold, wet or dry, and regulates your body temperature. That seems like reason enough to keep it healthy!

Experts suggest a balanced diet to get the foods you need for healthy skin -- and plenty of water, too. But some nutrients in particular seem to play a more important role in skin health.

SHOP NOW for Low Prices on Amazon's Top 100* Best Selling Skin Care Products
+ Free Shipping & Returns on Eligible Items.
(*Amazon's Top 100 list updated hourly.)

Vitamin A
Vitamin A can help maintain and repair skin tissue; one of the best sources is low-fat dairy products.

Vitamin C
A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that Vitamin C, along with lower intake of fat and carbohydrates, is associated with better skin-aging appearance. Almost all fruits and vegetables contain Vitamin C.

Essential fatty acids
Essential fatty acids, such as those found in salmon and walnuts, help keep cell membranes healthy, which in turn hold moisture in cells. This can help keep skin looking younger and healthier. Fatty acids also help protect against inflammation that can harm skin cells.

Other foods that may help the skin include avocados, olive oil, green tea, berries, beans and more. Remember, the key is a balanced and healthy diet.

Skincare no-no's
Put the kibosh on these activities that can render skin dry, wrinkled or otherwise damaged:

  • Sunbathing: Over time, sun exposure can cause wrinkling, age spots, rough skin and even cancer. If you have to be in the sun between the hours of 10 A.M. and 4 P.M., cover up or use sun screen (SPF 15 or higher ).
  • Smoking: Smoking can age your skin and contribute to wrinkles. If that's not enough, it's also the number one preventable cause of death.
  • Overuse of products: Too many soaps, antiperspirants and perfumes can dry out the skin.
  • Stress: Stress can make skin more sensitive and result in skin conditions such as acne.
  • Hot showers and strong soaps: Hot water can strip your skin of oils, drying it out. Take short showers in warm water.
  • Junk food: Eventually, what you eat is going to show on your skin. Eat a balanced diet to get the nutrients you need for healthy skin.


From the Fitness Desk...

Tips for finding a good workout partner
how to find a workout partner

Sticking to an exercise program can be difficult, but the prospect becomes a little less daunting when you have someone to share it with. Having an exercise buddy, fitness buddy or exercise accountability partner can help you stay motivated and consistent.

Finding your "bud"
An exercise buddy can be a friend, spouse, co-worker, neighbor -- anyone, really. If you have trouble recruiting someone you know, try posting a "want ad" at your gym, church or local parks and recreation department. You may also be able to find an exercise buddy online.

Choosing a compatible exercise partner
Just like any companion, you and your exercise partner should be compatible. If not, neither of you will gain the benefits of the partnership. Keep these tips in mind while selecting that perfect exercise partner:

  • Make sure you have similar goals
    If you want to run a marathon and your partner is content with a leisurely stroll, it's probably not going to work out. Discuss both partners' motivations and goals to ensure they mesh before starting out.
  • Assess your commitment levels
    If one partner is more committed than the other, the more serious of the duo won't get as much out of the partnership.
  • Sync your schedules
    You won't gain much benefit if you can't get together with your buddy very often. Select a partner whose schedule syncs with your own.

Wichita Tips for Healthy Living...

Relieve stress through better breathing

Here's a recipe for fame and wealth: Find something that everyone does everyday, without even thinking about it, that's proven to relieve stress. Make this "something" easy and pleasant while it rids the body of toxins at the same time. If you could bottle "it" you'd be a gazillionaire, but it's free: breathing.

To be more specific, this anti-stress miracle is deep breathing -- the kind where you fill your lungs deep down, hold, and then slowly exhale. Sure, most of us know that deep breathing gives a feeling of relaxation but did you know that "Breathe Deeply" is the very first key to good health. It's good to know all the positive ways that deep breathing can promote health and wellness.

Science has proven that deep breathing affects the heart, the brain, digestion and the immune system. Recently, a doctor in the Cleveland Clinic's Center for Integrative Medicine summed up modern research on deep breathing this way: "You can influence asthma; you can influence chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; you can influence heart failure." Studies are showing benefits to people with these and other conditions who practice breathing through exercises.

How breathing counteracts stress
The body's stress response is actually designed to be an asset. Our "fight-or-flight" natural programming speeds the heart rate and diverts blood away from the gut and to the muscles so we can run away. It constricts the pupils of our eyes so we can focus on an attacker. It dilates the small branches of the lungs to increase blood oxygenation, makes us breathe faster and converts energy stored in the liver into fuel for strength and stamina.

This stress response is a good thing when it keeps us safe. When we're under chronic stress, though, we're bombarding ourselves with chemicals and hormones that can damage our health in many ways.

So, while rapid breathing is part of the stress response, slow, deep breathing works the opposite way: It triggers our "relaxation response" and helps us calm down.

One easy relaxation technique
relieve stress through deep breathingTo get the most benefit from deep breathing, try this routine:

  • Lie down on a flat surface.
  • Place a hand on your stomach, just above your navel.
    Place the other hand on your chest.
  • Breathe in slowly and try to make your stomach rise a bit.
  • Hold your breath for a few seconds (not for so long it's uncomfortable).
  • Breathe out slowly and feel your stomach fall.

Once you know what deep breathing feels like, you'll find it easier to practice it in an office chair, in a car or almost any place or time when you feel that familiar tightness of stress. Of course, other wellness essentials apply here, too: Drink water, eat smart, enjoy exercise and get enough sleep. Then, you'll be physically prepared to practice the basics of emotional and spiritual wellness, too.

Low Prices on Best Selling SKIN CARE
PRODUCTS

SHOP NOW AT AMAZON

A Sampling of Today's Health News Headlines
CNN.com - RSS Channel - Health
CNN.com - RSS Channel - Health
CNN.com delivers up-to-the-minute news and information on the latest top stories, weather, entertainment, politics and more.
05/17/2022 03:34 PM
States prepare for summer launch of new 988 suicide prevention number
This summer, every state will be rolling out 988 as the new National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number to call for mental health crises -- similar to how people can call 911 for medical emergencies.

05/16/2022 06:24 AM
Overwhelmed health departments are hard-pressed to spend Covid cash for underserved
The Biden administration in March 2021 announced it was investing $2.25 billion to address covid health disparities, the largest federal funding initiative designed specifically to help underserved communities hardest hit by the virus.

05/13/2022 02:48 PM
Study identifies potential biomarker for SIDS, but a test for it is a long way off
Australian researchers say they've identified one potential biomarker for sudden infant death syndrome, known as SIDS, but experts caution that it's just one piece of the puzzle.

05/11/2022 07:15 PM
What you can and can't do to get through the infant formula shortage, according to experts
Misinformation about how families can get through the infant formula shortage is fueling concern among pediatricians like Dr. Tanya Altmann.

05/18/2022 04:17 AM
What you should know to master portion control
Portion sizes of some of your favorite foods have been getting bigger and bigger.

05/17/2022 10:49 AM
Knowing the signs of a stroke can make all the difference
When it comes to a stroke, acting fast is key.

NYT > Well
NYT > Well

05/19/2022 09:00 AM
Puberty Starts Earlier Than It Used To. No One Knows Why.
Some girls are starting to develop breasts as early as age 6 or 7. Researchers are studying the role of obesity, chemicals and stress.
05/19/2022 09:00 AM
My Girlfriend Wants an Open Relationship. Do I?
A reader is trying to figure out whether he’s willing to abandon exclusivity.
05/19/2022 07:55 AM
Seeking Pills, Young People Head to Social Media, With Deadly Results
The soaring drug fatalities in the U.S. are being fueled partly by fentanyl-tainted pills bought by teenagers and young adults on Snapchat, Instagram, TikTok and other social media apps.
05/19/2022 05:00 AM
Things to Do in Los Angeles 2022: Restaurants, Museums and Festivals
The city has a lot more to offer than the obvious, with new genre-bending restaurants and bars, and happenings galore. Its comeback story is well underway.
05/18/2022 05:23 PM
Men, Share Your Stories About Abortion
Have you been in the position of supporting or objecting to a woman’s decision to end a pregnancy?
05/18/2022 04:09 PM
Over 75 Percent of Long Covid Patients Were Not Hospitalized for Initial Illness, Study Finds
Researchers analyzed the largest database of private insurance claims in the United States in the first four months after a diagnostic code for long Covid was created.
05/17/2022 03:00 PM
Tiny Love Stories: ‘I Begged Him for a Sign’
Modern Love in miniature, featuring reader-submitted stories of no more than 100 words.
05/17/2022 05:00 AM
Doctors Gave Her Antipsychotics. She Decided to Live With Her Voices.
A new movement wants to shift mainstream thinking away from medication and toward greater acceptance.
05/17/2022 05:00 AM
How Can I Wake Up Earlier? Tips for Becoming a Morning Person
While some people are genetically prone to staying up late, a new morning routine can help shift your sleep clock.
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
All Mayo Clinic health information topics
Mayo Clinic offers award-winning medical and health information and tools for healthy living.
05/18/2022 12:00 AM
Stroke rehabilitation: What to expect as you recover

05/18/2022 12:00 AM
Video: Tendon transfer to repair rotator cuff

A torn rotator cuff is sometimes repaired with a tendon from your back. Includes descriptive animated video.


05/18/2022 12:00 AM
Video: Reverse shoulder replacement

Reverse shoulder replacement may be needed if your rotator cuff is severely damaged. Includes descriptive animated video.


05/18/2022 12:00 AM
Video: Rotator cuff damage

Your rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that help hold your shoulder together. See how your rotator cuff can become damaged.


05/14/2022 12:00 AM
Surgery for stress urinary incontinence in women

05/13/2022 12:00 AM
Healthy sperm: Improving your fertility

05/13/2022 12:00 AM
Diabetic neuropathy types: Symptoms tell the story

05/13/2022 12:00 AM
Being assertive: Reduce stress, communicate better

05/12/2022 12:00 AM
Rheumatoid arthritis: Does pregnancy affect symptoms?

05/12/2022 12:00 AM
Atkins Diet: What's behind the claims?

05/12/2022 12:00 AM
Suicide grief

Showing comment(s)
Ron
January 29, 2012
When it comes to finding a jogging or walking partner, there's none better than a pet dog, as far as I'm concerned.
 
Copyright 2022 WichitaHealth.com. All rights reserved. /rss Subscribe to our RSS
Information provided here should not be relied on to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any condition, disease or illness. Please consult with your physician or health care professional for guidance on any health concern. WichitaHealth.com is a commercial website and is not affiliated with any government agency, university, or private medical center. COMPENSATION DISCLOSURE: This site may be compensated for products promoted here. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.